Welcome to the Trident!

Welcome to the “original” Trident Restaurant’s website! This site would like your help collecting photos, stories, and memories, from employees, patrons, and anyone that frequented this unique establishment/ experience from 1966 to 1976.

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The Kingston Trio’s Trident, at 558 Bridgeway in Sausalito, uniquely reflected what was going on in the late 60’s and through the mid 70’s in the Bay Area. New York had Studio 54 San Francisco had the Trident.  David Crosby called the Trident, “Ground zero for sex, drugs, and Rock and Roll!  Robin Williams worked there as a bus boy. Janis Joplin had her own table when she came in. Clint Eastwood and Sonny Barger (head of the Hell’s Angel’s) hung out regularly at the bar together. In 1972 and 1975, after their concerts, the Rolling Stones held private parties thrown by Bill Graham. The night the Trident closed in 1976, most of the employees had taken some sort of mind altering substance ,and the “kind” was freely indulged in throughout the evening … without any incidents or trouble from the Sausalito Police who were in attendence. This is just the tip of the iceberg. There are many stories here.  All surprisingly true!

What a trip!

Have the times changed? Your thoughts, stories, photos, and memories are welcomed!

Trident Restaurant Menu

The front and backside of the Trident Menu circa late sixties /early seventies. Check out the prices. Provided by Phillippa Farrar aka “Flip” phillippa.farrar@gmail.com                       Click on images to enlarge

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Phillipa worked at the Trident in the early seventies as a hostess. Here are some excerpts from her “Hostess Notes” provided to her by the Trident management. (Some of the notes are generic, and not to unusual or surprising, and have been skipped over) Here we go:  1. Never let people wander through the room aimlessly. Tell them they must be seated or leave.  At busy times tell them about our $3 minimum.  2. You are the first impression that customers have of the Trident, so always be fresh and smiling. Don’t put any low energy trips on them. Learn to give good vibes with no effort.   3. Smile and act concerned.

Sergio Mendes – Call for Photos, Home Movies, Recording

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Call for Photos, Home Movies, Recordings
A producer working on a film about Sergio Mendes is interested in photos of Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’65 during the period that the band performed at The Trident.
Initial research shows that the band performed at The Trident in the first half of 1965 for four weeks.
If you have any photos, home movie footage, or recordings of the performance, please contact

The Year Was 1972

Jiro, Marty, Eric, and Robin Williams

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If the parking lot could talk…. ?

Video

Woody Allen Trident Flashback

Peace and Love from Gordon “Pete” Apps

2tridentnightshot2016Before there was an App for that we’ve enter the mind and memories of Gordon Peter “Pete” Apps who sends out Peace and Love to ya’ll.

“Speaking of unforgettable people: who could ever forget (I’ve tried, to no aaaaavail) mis compadres Charlie Bruscino and Larry “Bagger” Kimzey?   – and that wacky but lovable goon squad in the kitchen: Pierre, Barry Ginsberg, David Smythe, Harold Ehrman, Tom Eng, Nic(odemas), and Neil (“Uncle Wally”); and Toomey, Gordo (Ed Sanchez) kickin’ ass on the day shift – and that wacky but lovable goon squad on the floor: hostesses, bartenders, ‘spresso/juicers, table bussers, and enchantresses? – and that w-b-lovable goon squad in THE OFFICE!?!   I remember an impressive (well, I”M impressed [easily]) number of “floor” people’s names-matched-in with-faces and/or names-and-voices-matched-with-bosoms  – crucial when putting out orders through that tiny service window in the kitchen). Too, too many names to mention (Eduardo, Erik, Gary, Chris & Henry of Cosmic Popcorn, Gordy, Kenny Beckerman, Bruce Binder, Patrick Connally, Evan, Jack E. Flatt of Kid Courage , Wild Bill Pritchard, Buck, et. al.) I was fortunate to inter-be and have friendships with a number of them. And I gotta tell ya: What a cast of characters! Fellini should be rolling and rocking in his grave. If only. If only…. Kinda loved them all. Open-heartedly and com-passionately. In a perfect world I’d like to be able to see them (you, us) all again. In the next world, I cain’t hardly wait to “hey, y’all” Michael, Pierre, Lou, Frank, and Terry, and, sad thought, how many others? of us? Golden children in a golden era….

There were two ladies that I was especially fond of: Kathy Mac (Hughes-McMahon?) and Caroline Goldfish (Fishgold). Beautiful and always nice to me. Kinda friend-ly-like, when I think about it. Meant a whole lot to me. Still does. And ladies, poor me is widowed now, and available. Ready and eager to fall in love, or, at least,a deep and lasting like , again.”

Blue Cheer

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Recent “comment” to this site from Eric Albronda
While producing Blue Cheer’s 4 th album in San Francisco I went to the Trident all the time . At one point a dear friend of mine Buck Sumski was hoisting Michael James Brody Heir to Oleo Margarine fortune and then recent Ed Sullivan Preformer . He loaned me his briefcase Phone . I took it to the Trident and boy did I feel like a big shot –Actually I was there that day to Meet with Nicky Hopkins , Piano Player for the stars > I wanted to produce a solo album of his which never happened because after our meeting and my explaining what a good idea it was he did it himself . At the same meeting was Jeff Beck who was lurking in the shadows. L:eave it to those Brits they never miss a trick.

Fond memories of The Trident – no that special feeling will never come back but as Ken Babbs told me when I was asking him why I felt so strongly about the time he answered by saying – If you had the spirit and you still have the spirit then it is your responsibility to share that with as many people as possible . I try to do this every day but oh what a feeling back then – I am so glad I was alive and participating in the music scene at the time. thank you everybody that added to my experience at the Trident.

 

Bobby Lozoff and the Tequila Sunrise


 

Bobby Lozhoff on KTVU television January 11th, 2016 –  being interviewed for being the creator of the modern day Tequila Sunrise. Post from Jeff Burkhart aka “The Barfly” who writes for a variety of publications including National Geographic.

The Tequila sunrise legend finally gets his due A friend who works in the film business once said, “Being on a film set is just standing around watching other people standing around.” And that is exactly what I was doing.

I had been invited to the shooting of a documentary/commercial being filmed by Jose Cuervo at the legendary Trident restaurant in Sausalito. I was not there at the behest of the Cuervo people, I was there as a guest of the star of the show itself, Bobby Lozoff, former Trident bartender and the legendary inventor of the tequila sunrise. It was the first time in nearly 40 years that Lozoff had set foot back in the Trident. “I walked out of this place on Dec. 14, 1975, and I haven’t touched another bottle since,” he whispered to me. The Trident officially closed that day and Lozoff subsequently moved to Hawaii where he opened the Blue Max, a live music nightclub patterned on his incarnation of the Trident (the Trident was reopened in 2012 by Bob Freeman who also owns the Buena Vista in San Francisco).

I knew Lozoff because I had interviewed him back in 2011, first for my Barfly column in the IJ and then for a feature story I wrote for the National Geographic Assignment blog in 2012. Over the years we have kept in touch, but since he lived in Hawaii and I lived here, we had actually never met in person.
Now we stood in the bar of the rechristened Trident and swapped bartender stories while an army of film people swarmed around us. Lozoff is something of a celebrity these days. In the bar and cocktail world it is rare to actually have the inventor of a world-famous cocktail still around, or even identifiable, for that matter. Cocktails come and go, but the really famous tipples are all 75 to 100 years old. Even the Moscow mule, which is all the rage right now, traces its heritage back to the 1940s.  One of the relative newcomers is the tequila sunrise. The name was coined in the 1930s but the drink, as we know it — tequila, orange juice and grenadine — was invented in the early 1970s by Lozoff at the Trident. It’s almost like being able to ask Ian Fleming himself exactly what he meant by “shaken, not stirred.” Regardless of what you think of the drink, there is no denying its far-reaching fame. Movies and rock songs have made use of it. On a recent trip to Paris, I saw the drink on at least two cocktail menus. That kind of fame does not go unnoticed.

Jose Cuervo tequila has used the drink twice to promote its product — once in the 1970s and again recently in a television ad using the Rolling Stones’ 1972 tour as a backdrop. It was Lozoff himself who introduced Cuervo to the Stones at the Trident in 1972.  The first time around Cuervo neglected to mention Lozoff. This time around the company appears to be more than making up for it.
“We’re almost ready for you,” a pretty film assistant said, interrupting Lozoff as he pointed out the espresso bar that he helped build more than 40 years ago.
“They want me to make 10 or so fancy cocktails,” he tells me. “Why don’t you do it?” The Cuervo people want none of that. “I’m just an old hippie bartender,” he said, declining. “In my day it was, ‘You’re not ready [to order]?’ Next!” he said pointing to an invisible patron.

It might have been 40 years ago, but Lozoff is still a bartender at heart. He’ll be the first to admit that he doesn’t particularly care for grenadine; he calls it a name unfitting for a newspaper. But as any real bartender will tell you, what the customer wants is what the customer gets, and back then grenadine ruled the day. Lozoff prefers a sunrise with crème de cassis, a black currant liqueur, but he acknowledges that the drink is prettier with grenadine. He also adds that “making it with both” is optimum. The new Trident agrees, featuring that version on its menu. As for Cuervo and the Stones’ preferences, we will simply have to wait and see.

The last I saw of Lozoff, assistants were powdering his face for a close-up. Forty years later he’s finally getting his due. Better late than never.
Jeff Burkhart is the author of “20 Years Behind Bars: The Spirited Adventures of a Real Bartender” as well as an award-winning bartender at a local restaurant.

Trident Waitress Flashback

Late sixties? Early seventies? A 32 second clip of some Trident waitresses on their way to work after parking in the lot across the street from the Trident. My apologies for the poor quality. Originally a 16mm version shot to Betamax then digitalized. But thanks to Rob Lawson – Terry the bartenders brother for the clip.

Donna

in 1968 I went to work for the Kingston Trio at the Trident when it was a jazz club…it was a happening scene..Mills Davis..Sergo Mendes and all the Jazz greats..I was a cocktail waitress..a bad coctails waitress…this was pre LSD and Tune in ..Turn on..Drop out…when that happened The Trio and Frank Werber decided to close it down and hip it up…the finished Restaurant was amazing..I was the first hired because I had previously worked there…Many beautiful women were hired…Frank of course oversaw everything but we had a manager who’s name I can’t remember now..a gentle older man that I adored…It was the “IT” place..I would be serving  people likeNeil Young as he wrote lyrics on a napkin…dealing with David Crosby and his over the top fun personality…if there was a celebrity in San Francisco they would cross the bridge to have the Trident experience…many good times..many friends..Helen stands and of course Gretchen and her homemade cookies…but Frank was my very very dear friend…loved him and he was always there for me…there were some bad times of course…cooks who were grouchy…and bartenders that were so demanding..I wasn’t a very good waitress but because I was well liked I kept my job..even during the times I needed to leave to go to Maui and other places ..I would always have a job waiting for me when I returned…it is also where Bill Cosby decided it was me that he knew he wanted and it is a horrible memory of what he did to me..I couldn’t tell anyone because he was so beloved and no one would have believed me…there were many great times with big stars with big egos and some with very big hearts..Lily Tomlin comes to mind….and of course the night we closed for the Rolling Stones..What an honor to be chosen to be there that night..with all their bad boy reputation they were total gentlemen..I left at the end of 1972 with fond memories and gratitude for my time there. Donna Motsinger  email: binkybaby78@gmail.com

Donna and her son Jeff “back in the days” when she was working at the Trident

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