Monthly Archives: September 2015

Cuervo Gold, The Rolling Stones, The Trident, and the Origin of the Tequila Sunrise

The Rolling Stones 1972 Tour is the stuff of legend — debauchery in full swing, the epitome of sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll. More than four decades later, Cuervo tequila pays homage to the group’s hedonistic past in a new commercial. The video for the commercial has been taken down on YouTube so we are unable to offer it here.

The spot had stated that the band connection from the start: “In 1972, the Rolling Stones took Jose Cuervo on tour. Rock ‘n’ roll would never be the same.” The commercial unfolds aboard a plane full of musicians, groupies and hangers-on. “The tour that became legend. The drink that fueled it,” says an onscreen tag.

According to National Geographic, Mick Jagger was first introduced to the golden elixir at a party shortly before the tour. “Mick came up to the bar and asked for a margarita,” recalled Bobby Lozoff, the man behind the Tequila Sunrise. “I asked him if he had ever tried a Tequila Sunrise, he said no, I built him one and they started sucking them up. After that, they took them all across the country.” In his 2010 autobiography, Life, Keith Richards said the 1972 road show was known as “the cocaine and Tequila Sunrise tour.”

The Stones themselves don’t appear in the ad, and there seems to be more fantasy than fact playing throughout the clip. But that soundtrack has us a bit confused. As a pretty lady wanders the plane aisles handing out glasses of tequila, the Rolling Stones can be heard loud and clear. The only problem? The song playing is “Miss You,” which wasn’t released until 1978.

Artistic license, perhaps, but still a glaring mistake in the timeline. “The spot is inspired by the Stones in the ’70s, and with so much passion around this legendary band, song choice would naturally spark debate,” said a spokesperson from McCann, the company behind the ad. “As we developed the creative, we found that this iconic song best captures the spirit of that era.”

Even though Cuervo was wise to avoid reenacting any of the coke snorting, dope shooting and other less-than-family-friendly scenes from the tour, we think the commercial itself comes off a little too squeaky clean to have any real ties to the gritty surroundings of that era.