Tag Archives: Trident Restaurant

Josie

A little story of my “Trident days!
Ahhh “The Trident”, my very first job, ever!  I met so many cool people, celebrities (Rod Stewart, who whistle to get my attention and got my reply as his friends were flabbergasted), the Stones whom I partied with at the Mark Hopkins, Bill Wyman, who had a thing for me and sent his limo to pick me up at 3 am to hang with him at the Record Plant (his woman at the time who threatened me for being with him),  and oh so many other interesting men I met!.
I worked with some of the most amazing women I have ever known! I am forever grateful of having been there at that special time. Shout out to my girls, Mimi (RIP), Patsy , Monique, Katie, Jan, Noreen, Leigh, Kathleen, Marsha, Donna, Poppy, Cassandra, Stevie, Bonnie, Sharlee, Herta (my partner in Boob Flashing the Ferry first thing in the morning!). Remembering how we all trailed to the ladies room when someone gave us a stash!  A special thank you to the man who came every day I worked and gave me a $100 bill folded and full! (you know who you are). These women somehow are part of my life!
Bobby the bartender who was always pissed at me cuz I didn’t know how to order the drinks, he once told me it was a good thing I was so cute, because i sucked as a waitress…bahahaha.  The kitchen guys whom I always flashed (for my orders) , just to make them smile, Pierre (RIP) who loved my boobs! I could have anything I wanted in that kitchen, I loved my job! Lou the sweetest and most compassionate man I ever met, his family, also form part of my entourage of dear people close to my heart growing as a woman.
I learned and mentally grew at that restaurant. I will forever be thankful to have been one of the Trident Girls, even though I was told many times that I wouldn’t be hired because of this!  I tell the tales to my kids, (sans some details) of how I was such an outrageous waitress, what a great time we had! These memories will forever live in my heart!
Thank you Mark for giving me the chance to connect with some of the girls and
 re live some of that wonderful ride that was “The Trident”
Josie
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Trident Babes recently submitted  left to right:  Monique, Mimi, Josie and Patsy …looking good! And Josie back in the day!

Blue Cheer

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Recent “comment” to this site from Eric Albronda
While producing Blue Cheer’s 4 th album in San Francisco I went to the Trident all the time . At one point a dear friend of mine Buck Sumski was hoisting Michael James Brody Heir to Oleo Margarine fortune and then recent Ed Sullivan Preformer . He loaned me his briefcase Phone . I took it to the Trident and boy did I feel like a big shot –Actually I was there that day to Meet with Nicky Hopkins , Piano Player for the stars > I wanted to produce a solo album of his which never happened because after our meeting and my explaining what a good idea it was he did it himself . At the same meeting was Jeff Beck who was lurking in the shadows. L:eave it to those Brits they never miss a trick.

Fond memories of The Trident – no that special feeling will never come back but as Ken Babbs told me when I was asking him why I felt so strongly about the time he answered by saying – If you had the spirit and you still have the spirit then it is your responsibility to share that with as many people as possible . I try to do this every day but oh what a feeling back then – I am so glad I was alive and participating in the music scene at the time. thank you everybody that added to my experience at the Trident.

 

Bobby Lozoff and the Tequila Sunrise


 

Bobby Lozhoff on KTVU television January 11th, 2016 –  being interviewed for being the creator of the modern day Tequila Sunrise. Post from Jeff Burkhart aka “The Barfly” who writes for a variety of publications including National Geographic.

The Tequila sunrise legend finally gets his due A friend who works in the film business once said, “Being on a film set is just standing around watching other people standing around.” And that is exactly what I was doing.

I had been invited to the shooting of a documentary/commercial being filmed by Jose Cuervo at the legendary Trident restaurant in Sausalito. I was not there at the behest of the Cuervo people, I was there as a guest of the star of the show itself, Bobby Lozoff, former Trident bartender and the legendary inventor of the tequila sunrise. It was the first time in nearly 40 years that Lozoff had set foot back in the Trident. “I walked out of this place on Dec. 14, 1975, and I haven’t touched another bottle since,” he whispered to me. The Trident officially closed that day and Lozoff subsequently moved to Hawaii where he opened the Blue Max, a live music nightclub patterned on his incarnation of the Trident (the Trident was reopened in 2012 by Bob Freeman who also owns the Buena Vista in San Francisco).

I knew Lozoff because I had interviewed him back in 2011, first for my Barfly column in the IJ and then for a feature story I wrote for the National Geographic Assignment blog in 2012. Over the years we have kept in touch, but since he lived in Hawaii and I lived here, we had actually never met in person.
Now we stood in the bar of the rechristened Trident and swapped bartender stories while an army of film people swarmed around us. Lozoff is something of a celebrity these days. In the bar and cocktail world it is rare to actually have the inventor of a world-famous cocktail still around, or even identifiable, for that matter. Cocktails come and go, but the really famous tipples are all 75 to 100 years old. Even the Moscow mule, which is all the rage right now, traces its heritage back to the 1940s.  One of the relative newcomers is the tequila sunrise. The name was coined in the 1930s but the drink, as we know it — tequila, orange juice and grenadine — was invented in the early 1970s by Lozoff at the Trident. It’s almost like being able to ask Ian Fleming himself exactly what he meant by “shaken, not stirred.” Regardless of what you think of the drink, there is no denying its far-reaching fame. Movies and rock songs have made use of it. On a recent trip to Paris, I saw the drink on at least two cocktail menus. That kind of fame does not go unnoticed.

Jose Cuervo tequila has used the drink twice to promote its product — once in the 1970s and again recently in a television ad using the Rolling Stones’ 1972 tour as a backdrop. It was Lozoff himself who introduced Cuervo to the Stones at the Trident in 1972.  The first time around Cuervo neglected to mention Lozoff. This time around the company appears to be more than making up for it.
“We’re almost ready for you,” a pretty film assistant said, interrupting Lozoff as he pointed out the espresso bar that he helped build more than 40 years ago.
“They want me to make 10 or so fancy cocktails,” he tells me. “Why don’t you do it?” The Cuervo people want none of that. “I’m just an old hippie bartender,” he said, declining. “In my day it was, ‘You’re not ready [to order]?’ Next!” he said pointing to an invisible patron.

It might have been 40 years ago, but Lozoff is still a bartender at heart. He’ll be the first to admit that he doesn’t particularly care for grenadine; he calls it a name unfitting for a newspaper. But as any real bartender will tell you, what the customer wants is what the customer gets, and back then grenadine ruled the day. Lozoff prefers a sunrise with crème de cassis, a black currant liqueur, but he acknowledges that the drink is prettier with grenadine. He also adds that “making it with both” is optimum. The new Trident agrees, featuring that version on its menu. As for Cuervo and the Stones’ preferences, we will simply have to wait and see.

The last I saw of Lozoff, assistants were powdering his face for a close-up. Forty years later he’s finally getting his due. Better late than never.
Jeff Burkhart is the author of “20 Years Behind Bars: The Spirited Adventures of a Real Bartender” as well as an award-winning bartender at a local restaurant.

Deja Views…a Retrospective from Richard Lipfield

About to walk into the Trident on a Saturday evening to begin my shift… place is full…one shift ending , another beginning…..customers everywhere… rock and roll…. beautiful women…. one hour wait …sensory overload …I NEED TO FOCUS !!!!!! signing waitresses out in the cloak room..making sure everyone has shown up for their shift……adjust the music level to match the intensity of the room as it undulates…unread the log and check in with the floor manager… say hello to PIERRE….(scarey if he is not smiling )..can’t let him see my fear ………no room for mistakes….. any drunks roaming the room ?…coke heads…heroine ?…hells angels ??,…..anyone harassing the girls…. where is Ron Mxcannon.. hope he is not here to add craziness to the situation….here comes FRANK AND DIANE…need to welcome them… I know frank will notice the one thing in the room that is out of place,and he will definitely tell me about it !…. PRESSURE but that is what it takes to makes the TRIDENT what it is..one of the most exciting, fun, dynamic restaurants in the world… everyone of us is proud to be part of the event ….working harder than we have ever worked in our lives !!!smiling..buzzed..stoned…most of us keeping our balance..someone usually losing it…..I’m manager, counselor, friend and mentor…..is that a plain clothes policeman in the corner ?….the local police get us…they know!! but they, like the girls appreciate the smiles they get.. they give us space…..the room is calming down.. need to put softer music on to calm the tribe… I get to eat now….o.k. here we go… a full night of spontaneous interactions as the clientele enter our room.. in whatever condition they are in.. and with whatever attitude the choose….keep it flowing.. watch every detail as we interact and present our magic food… time to go into the office and put on the fan and smoke a joint….there that’s better.. now I fell more harmonious with the event.. oh oh..BOBBY wants me to 86 a drunk from the bar..stay neutral, be firm…DONE….need a lift.. alittle coke will help.. there now I AM ON TOP OF IT AGAIN…only a few hours to go… time for my first drink…TEQUILA SUNRISE…..relaxed but staying alert…..can never let it down.. things can happen fast… oh no… did that lady just throw the ashtray at her date ??? calm them down or walk them out…..room is starting to empty out…good…..start sending some of the staff home…the clean up crew is beginning to show up for their all night shift… here comes MILTON AND PATRICK..close the doors.. put the money away…..now the big lights come on and they destroy the illusion .. food everywhere, dirty tables, dirty floors, kitchen needs to be deconstructed and cleaned… by morning the guys have brought it back to perfection for the next shift… and here we go again… I DID THIS FOR TEN YEARS WITH THE HELP OF THE MOST DYNAMIC, CREATIVE PEOPLE ON THE PLANET !!!!! LOVE TO YOU ALL….. RICHARD  Email Richard at: RLipfield@aol.com

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The Trident and the Tequila Sunrise

ABOUT A YEAR AGO   Mark Lomas, a former bartender who runs the Trident Restaurant website, and I had lunch. We sat in the main dining room of the Trident in Sausalito and swapped bar stories. I had once worked at the briefly reopened Ondine, which was above the original Trident.

Owned by the Kingston Trio, the Trident was way ahead of its time. From 1966 to the mid- 1970s it was the place to be in the Bay Area. Famed for its beautiful waitresses and musical pedigree, it also featured such innovations as sashimi, a fresh juice bar and an espresso bar.

After numerous stories about rock ‘n’ rollers, waitresses, Robin Williams (once a busboy at the Trident), Lomas mentioned that the tequila sunrise had been invented there.

Now, I was reasonably sure that the tequila sunrise had been invented long before that, but I tucked away that information along with the phone number of the bartender who supposedly did that inventing.

From my research, I learned that:

• The Arizona Biltmore hotel claims that bartender Gene Sulit invented the tequila sunrise there in the late 1930s, consisting of tequila, lime juice, soda and crème de cassis.

• The recipe most people are familiar with; tequila orange juice and grenadine appeared for the very first time in the 1974 version of Mr. Boston’s Bartender’s Guide.

Hmmm.

Drink origins are always a little murky. Take the martini, for instance. The town of Martinez claims that it was invented there in 1874. In fact it put up a historical landmark to “certify” the event. It doesn’t seem to matter that the drink invented there was called the Martinez Special, or that it included bitters, as well as a different kind of gin and a totally different kind of vermouth. There it sits, certified in stone: “Birthplace of the Martini.”

Eventually I called the so-called inventor of the tequila sunrise. Bobby Lazoff, 63, splits his time between computer IT work and teaching tutorials while living in Hawaii. But back in 1969 he was a fresh-faced 20-year-old looking for work in Sausalito. “I did about two or three days as a dishwasher,” he said. “Then I was a busboy and when I got old enough I became a bartender.” He claimed to have taken the bartending very seriously. “The Trident was a rock ‘n’ roll haven and tequila was the ‘in’ drink,” he said. So he and another bartender, Billy Rice, started experimenting. “Anything made with gin or vodka we started making with tequila,” he said. “A couple of them didn’t turn out too well.” One drink that did turn out well was a resurrected tequila sunrise. “We built it in a chimney glass; a shot of tequila with one hand, a shot of sweet and sour with the other hand, the soda gun, then orange juice, float crème de cassis on top, grenadine if you wanted, and that was it, the tequila sunrise.” Eventually, the bartenders simplified the recipe to just tequila, orange juice and grenadine.

“We had a Rolling Stones party (the kickoff of the media frenzy that was their 1972 tour) one Monday night when we were usually closed,” Lazoff said. “The owner called me in and put me behind the bar. We had a select menu, a couple of the prettier waitresses and that was the party. Bill Graham brought in about 35 people, and you know the place holds several hundred. Mick came up to the bar and asked for a margarita, I asked him if he had ever tried a tequila sunrise, he said no, I built him one and they started sucking them up. After that they took them all across the country.”

OK, I thought, all I had to do was get the Rolling Stones to verify that and we could reasonably assume that Lazoff might be indeed be responsible for the most recognizable incarnation of the tequila sunrise.

Rather unlikely. As a result, the story sat until I picked up Keith Richards’ book “Life,” published this past October. Chapter nine, sentence No. 1: “The ’72 tour was known by other names — the cocaine and tequila sunrise tour … ” I could not believe my eyes.

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I realized that I should probably be a little more trusting, and that the Trident might want to look into historical markers.

Jeff Burkhart is an author, regular contributor to National Geographic Assignment and an award-winning bartender at a Marin restaurant. Contact him at jeffb@thebarflyonline.com.  The National Geographic Article by Jeff, Not Just Another Tequila Sunrise, can be found elsewhere on this site. Similar, but completely different. Or, as they say, “The Same Difference?”

1990 Trident Marin Independent Journal Article

Sausalito’s Trident was THE Place to Be! It was the archetypal fern bar, the creme de la hip Sausalito saloon that floated on sex, drugs, and Rock and Roll. The Trident was open from 1961 to 1980. Launched as a Jazz Club by the Kingston Trio, it was refurbished in 1968 by the group’s manager Frank Werber, who sought to catch the spontaneous, give peace a chance spirit of the day.

It became a mecca for rock stars,celebrities and hipsters, young and old. “It was like riding a hurrican,” says Werber, now 61 and living in Maui. “The Trident was definitely a manifestation of it’s time and a forerunner and trendsetter for multitudes of restaurants, and it’s effects are still being felt in the cool 90s.

Staffers were like family members who regarded the place as a chapel, it was a spiritual experience.” The Trident hosted impromptu concerts by Mick Jagger, Janis Joplin, threw legendary parties and provided the setting for a scene from Woody Allen’s “Play It Again Sam”” It’s story attractions included platoons of attractive waitresses hired as much for their good looks as their ability to charm customers. Robin Williams, then a struggling comedian, worked there for a time as a busboy, getting the job “because of his antics,” Werber said.

Employees were hired after Trident executives reviewed Polaroid pictures of them. A prospect’s persona was also critical. Among the

Trident’s hallmarks were handcrafted wood, stained glass, art and music. Organic food laced an eclectic menu. The menu – a psychedelic work of art that now sells for $100 a print – exclaimed: “Welcome to our space. Positive energy projection is the trip.”

Located at 558 Bridgeway beneath the old Ondine’s and now the home of Horizons, the Trident was favored by Woody Allen, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Clint Eastwood, Tommy Smothers, Groucho Marx, David Crosby,StevenStills, Pink Floyd, Allan Watts, and scores of other noted customers.

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Trident Memories

I was a former “patron” if that is the correct description for some one who had just turned 18 and was in the company of my older brother Seth. I have some fond memories of the Trident and a lot of blurry  images in my brain from nights of over indulgence. 

At the time, (1971)my brother and I were sharing a house in Sausalito and he was running the Magnolia Cinema in Larkspur with two partners Barry Bedrick and Charlie Kessler. Seth had been involved with Janis Joplin and we often were hanging out with former members of the Holding Company, the Cockettes and various other nefarious and colorful characters from the Bay area. There were often impromptu gatherings at our house with various substances being laid out on the coffee table and then a trip to the Trident for late night drinks. At my age, I variously fell in love with every single waitress who worked there, none of whom seemed to find the attentions of an eighteen year old particularly enchanting. 

There were several hilarious incidents which took place, one of which sticks in my memory. The Trident used to have sliding glass doors which opened onto the outside deck. They were always kept spotlessly clean so it was difficult to tell they were even there. If my memory serves me correctly, there was a carved wooden son on each of the doors which should have served to warn you that you needed to slide the door open before proceeding to the deck area, but newcomers often walked smack into them to the combined merriment of the patrons. 

One afternoon, just such an event occurred and Seth was laughing his head off at the misfortune of some poor tourista,  the only funnier thing in the world being when he performed exactly the same stunt about an hour and several drinks later. 

Some memories are not as nice….

Being in the back of a borrowed Volkswagon Beetle  on the way back from the Trident where Seth had picked up a hooker and they both had done some drugs. He kept trying to put the moves on her as the bug sped along the twisting hillside roads around the town, swerving at the last minute to avoid collisions and cliff edges. Requests that he pay attention to his driving were ignored or answered with snarls and eventually the inevitable happened and he side swiped a parked vehicle and then fled the scene.

It was a foreshadowing of his death in 1990 when he crashed his Harley on a New Orleans bridge killing both himself and his passenger. He left behind a novel based on his prison experiences in the late 1970’s which was critically acclaimed. 

But he loved the Trident and so did I!.

The link here is to a photo I took of Seth at the Trident in the summer of 1971. He is on the right and the gentleman on the left was a fellow named Tim who ran the Boogie Bakery in Larkspur which was next door to the Magnolia cinema.

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Trident Waitress Flashback

Late sixties? Early seventies? A 32 second clip of some Trident waitresses on their way to work after parking in the lot across the street from the Trident. My apologies for the poor quality. Originally a 16mm version shot to Betamax then digitalized. But thanks to Rob Lawson – Terry the bartenders brother for the clip.